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Joel Tito

2010 Recipient

Between receiving the BCG Scholarship in 2010 and joining BCG in 2014, Joel completed an honors degree in philosophy, worked as an associate at the Supreme Court and at Maurice Blackburn Lawyers, and attended clown school in Paris.

Joel was awarded the BCG Scholarship in his sixth year of studying arts, law, and Japanese at the University of Melbourne. He was on exchange at the time, and the scholarship allowed him to complete his studies in Japan and pursue his love of writing and performing comedy.

Joel was interested in BCG because of its work in Aboriginal communities and community development in Australia’s far north. After graduating from Melbourne High School in 2004, he studied at the University of Melbourne, where he completed a bachelor of arts (political science and philosophy), a bachelor of law and a diploma of modern languages (Japanese). Joel's studies in philosophy have focused on classical and non-classical logic systems, giving him the ability to analyze and understand problems from a theoretical perspective—which also applies to his work at BCG.

At university, Joel's award-wining comedy troupe Vigilantelope toured the Melbourne International Comedy Festival, the Adelaide Fringe Festival, Melbourne Fringe Festival, and World’s Funniest Island Festival. He also volunteered for the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency, umpired for the Northern Territory Australian Football League, and worked for the Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service and Victorian Legal Aid.

Working at BCG has provided Joel with valuable real-world experience and the chance to meet interesting people. It's also given him a clearer picture of how he works best, which he plans to apply to further study of philosophy, policy, or law. Some advice for this year's applicants? Don't self-filter in the application. Obscure skills are often important in a process like this. And grades are not a barrier; they are important, but so is having a critical mind.

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